Carol will never go away again

Legendary Broadway actress Carol Channing passes away at 97 Carol Channing died of natural causes at 12:31 a.m. Tuesday in Rancho Mirage, California. She had twice suffered strokes in the last year. Broadway will dim its lights for Channing tomorrow night at 7:45 pm ET, The Broadway League announced today.

Carol Channing was born January 31, 1921, at Seattle, Washington, the daughter of a prominent newspaper editor, who was very active in the Christian Science movement. She attended high school in San Francisco and later worked as a model in Los Angeles. She attended prestigious Bennington College in Vermont and majored in drama and dance and supplemented her work by taking parts in nearby Pocono Resort area.

Carol initially made her mark on Broadway in “Gentleman Prefer Blondes” playing Lorelei Lee. In Hello Dolly, she played Dolly Gallagher Levi, the witty, manipulative widow intent upon finding a wealthy husband. The musical won ten Tony awards in 1964, including Channing’s for best actress in a comedy.

Channing’s outsized personality seemed too much for the screen, and she made only a few movies, notably “The First Traveling Saleslady” with Ginger Rogers and “Thoroughly Modern Millie” with Julie Andrews.

Over the years, Channing continued as Dolly in national tours, the last in 1996, when she was in her 70s. Tom Shales of The Washington Post called her “the ninth wonder of the world.”

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Who’s Line is it Anyway

Jazz piano master, Shelly Berg, is returning to the Palladium Side Door this Thursday

Shelly Berg, who’s been called “the best jazz pianist you’ve never heard of,” is actually a familiar name to our audiences. He played the Palladium a few years ago and he’s well known around Florida as a jazz musician and educator.

 

But just in case you are wondering if you want to attend Shelly’s concert this Thursday, Jan. 10, in the Side Door, I’ve gathered some materials that should easily get you to “Yes.”

 

Berg, a multiple Grammy nominee, is paired with two of our favorite jazz musicians, Mark Feinman, drums and Alejandro Arenas, on bass. That same duo back Shelly the last time he was in town and were headliners for our John Lamb Birthday celebration last Sunday.

 

For tickets and information on this show on 1-10-19 at 7:30 p.m. you can call our box office at 727-822-3590 or follow this link for online tickets. While most of the Side Door show is General Admission, a few Reserved seats are still available.

 

Here is a bio and below that, a promo for Shelly’s Grammy nominated 2005 album, Blackbird, on Concord Records:

 

Shelly Berg is a Steinway piano artist and multi-Grammy nominated arranger and producer. His latest album Gershwin Reimagined: An American in London with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is conducted by José Serebrier and produced by Gregg Field (Decca Gold).

 

Shelly BergThe All Music Guide says “Shelly Berg is one of the finest pianists around in the early 21st century playing modern mainstream jazz.” His recording project The Deep with bassist Dave Finck on Chesky Records is widely praised for its versatility and virtuosity with 4.5 stars from DownBeat magazine. His solo project Shelly Berg: The Nearness of You (Arbors) and a two-piano album with Dick Hyman Meeting of Minds (Victoria) are also both critically acclaimed. His album Blackbird, recorded with the Shelly Berg Trio on the Concord Records label, reached #1 in US jazz radio and garnered Record of the Year and Artist of the Year nominations (Jazzweek, 2005).

 

Shelly Berg

Berg was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category as co-arranger of “I Loves You Porgy / There’s a Boat That’s Leavin’ Soon for New York” from the album Rendezvous (2018) featuring jazz singers Clint Holmes and Dee Dee Bridgewater with The Count Basie Orchestra. He was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocals category for his arrangement of “Be My Muse” on Lorraine Feather’s album Flirting with Disaster (2015), as well as his arrangement of “What a Wonderful World” on Gloria Estefan: The Standards (2014), and “Out There” on Lorraine Feather’s Tales of the Unusual (2013). He was also nominated for a Grammy as co-producer of Gloria Estefan: The Standards in the Best Traditional Pop Album category.

 

Other recent recording and arranging projects include Seal’s Standards, Clint Black’s Rendezvous, Arturo Sandoval’s Grammy-winning Dear Diz (Every Day I Think of You) and Latin Grammy-winning A Time for Love, Reneé Fleming’s Christmas in New York with Friends, and Ray Sings, Basie Swings (Concord).

 

Berg is artistic advisor for Jazz Roots at the Adrienne Arsht Center in Miami, musical director of The Jazz Cruise, and host of the show Generation Next on Real Jazz Sirius XM. He has appeared on numerous NPR radio broadcasts for Jim Cullum’s Riverwalk Jazz series.

 

Shelly Berg has performed, recorded and arranged for renown jazz vocalists Patti Austin, Nancy Wilson, Bobby McFerrin, Kurt Elling, Carmen Bradford,  Tierney Sutton, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Lizz Wright, Cassandra Wilson, Lorraine Feather, Monica Mancini, and Dionne Warwick, and performed and/or recorded with a “Who’s Who” of jazz legends including Ray Brown, Louie Bellson, John Clayton, Eddie Daniels, Peter Erskine, Dave Finck, Branford Marsalis, Gregg Field, Chuck Berghofer, Dave Grusin, Woody Herman, Arturo Sandoval, Tom Scott, Clark Terry, and Bill Watrous to name just a few. A finalist in the 1988 Great American Jazz Piano Competition, Berg has recorded over 30 disks for the Yamaha Disklavier piano.

 

His composing and orchestrating for television includes ABC’s Fudge, CBS’s A League of Their Own, and HBO’s Dennis Miller Live. He has performed on television with Zac Brown, Mark Anthony, Gloria Estefan, James Taylor, Garth Brooks, Tricia Yearwood, Prince Royce, Patti LaBelle, Mariah Carey, and has orchestrated for Chicago, KISS, Carole King, Richard Marx, Joe Cocker, Elliott Smith, Lou Rawls, Steve Miller, Yoshiki, X Japan, and others.

 

Film orchestration work includes Warner Bros. Almost Heroes and For Your Consideration, Fox’s Men of Honor, and the NBC mini-series The ’60s. He has written for the Royal Philharmonic, the American Symphony, and orchestras worldwide. He composed the theme song to the 1986 U.S. Olympic Festival, and orchestrated Anniversary for the 10th anniversary of the coronation of Japan’s Emperor Akihito. His orchestrations are called “magnificent. . . incredible” by Johnny Mandel.

 

Shelly Berg is the dean of the Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music at the University of Miami, a position he has held since June 2007. In addition to his leadership role as dean, he is the Patricia L. Frost Professor of Music and teaches classical improvisation classes and private piano students. He previously held the McCoy/Sample endowed professorship of jazz studies in the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California where he taught for 16 years. He is a past president of the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE), and was named 2003 Educator of the Year by the Los Angeles Jazz Society. In 2002, Shelly was the recipient of the IAJE Lawrence Berk Leadership Award. In 2000, the Los Angeles Times named him one of three “Educators for the Millennium.” He has appeared as a performer and lecturer throughout the United States as well as in Canada, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Mexico, Europe, Japan, and Israel.

 

Berg has numerous compositions for jazz ensemble in publication, and his texts include the Chop-Monster improvisation series, Essentials of Jazz Theory, and Rhythm Section Workshop for Jazz Directors (Alfred Publishing), and Jazz Improvisation: The Goal-Note Method (Kendor Music).

 

FROM CONCORD RECORDS:

 

When Shelly Berg releases his first CD on a major label in 2005, the earlier descriptions of his limited recorded output-not to mention his being pigeonholed as an aggressive pianist with jaw-dropping technique-will no doubt be rewritten. Indeed, in stores on January 25, Blackbird reveals a somewhat surprising side to the former head of the International Association of Jazz Educators as he is joined by drummer Gregg Field and bassist Chuck Berghofer.

 

Previously, listeners may have described Berg as a swinging, extroverted musician in the exuberant, indomitable spirit of Oscar Peterson, one of his early inspirations. Blackbird, however, shows Berg to be a much more complex musician who is attuned to a broader range of emotions than his earlier recordings suggested. The CD, exquisitely performed and produced, captures Berg’s trio in a relaxed, sustained performance of songs with personal meaning to the pianist.

 

“With Blackbird, I just wanted to make a beautiful recording where there’s not a gratuitous note. I didn’t want to be thinking of ‘things to do’ on this record. I just wanted to explore the feelings of the songs,” says Berg who admits he’s been waiting for decades to record a few of the tracks on the new CD. He achieves his goal by considering the melodies-and the lyrics, though unsung-of each of the songs. “’All My Tomorrows’ resonates with me because it has one of the most beautiful lyrics that a love song can have. To me, a great song occurs when all of the elements come together.”

 

Berg personalizes the songs on Blackbird with warm voicings, effective dynamics, and a storyteller’s ability to craft an unforgettable dramatic experience from a promising simple theme. For example, the Trio stretches the rests of title track (written by Lennon and McCartney) to allow for glittering ornamentation that illuminates segments of the melody before they stretch out into upbeat straight-ahead improvisation. Those phrases are suspended as if independently overlaid on the underlying rhythm for a contemplation of their harmonic wonders.

 

In an approach similar to “Blackbird,” “She’s Always a Woman” consists of discrete melodic phrases connected by rests of harmonic resolution, though played with an obvious sense of joy. Berg slows Pat Matheny’s “Question and Answer” into a gorgeous jazz waltz whose harmonic possibilities for prismatic richness, the colors inextricably linked through gradual progressions, previously may have been overlooked in faster versions.

 

The undeniably effective underlying spirit of Blackbird reflects the camaraderie among the Trio’s members. Once again, Berg defies expectations by recording with musicians who may not necessarily be associated with this style of jazz. The bandleader notes, “I can’t say enough about Gregg and Chuck. I think their playing is going to raise some eyebrows about what these two guys can do. Their careers are going well, but I think it’s always great for them to get recognition in ways that they haven’t before.”

 

Born in 1955, Shelton G. Berg’s love of jazz came from his father, trumpeter Jay Berg, who performed with touring musicians like Charlie Parker and Sonny Stitt. A young prodigy, he was accepted into the Cleveland Institute of Music at the age of six. He moved to Houston in his early teens and soon thereafter started playing professionally, while still in High School, with Arnett Cobb, who provided him with the opportunity to jam with Lockjaw Davis, Al Grey and other members of Count Basie’s Orchestra, as well as with players from Woody Herman and Buddy Rich’s bands. Graduating summa cum laude twice from the University of Houston with bachelor and masters degrees in music, he worked for 12 years as the director of instrumental music at San Jacinto College in Pasadena, Texas. However, at the recommendation of Bill Watrous, Berg moved to Los Angeles, where he became a professor and the Chair of Jazz Studies in the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California. From 1996 to 1998, he was the president of the IAJE.

 

Musically, Berg has written commercial jingles for a host of Fortune 1000 companies, including Wendy’s, Dole, Texaco and Kelloggs. He has scored for films and television shows like Men of Honor, Almost Heroes, Fudge and Dennis Miller Live. And, he has written for such performers as Kurt Elling, Bonnie Raitt, KISS, Lou Rawls and Richard Marx, as well as the American Symphony, the Royal Philharmonic and the Dallas Philharmonic. In addition to publishing eight books about jazz theory and improvisation, as well as numerous music magazine articles, Berg has received numerous awards, including the IAJE Lawrence Berk Leadership Award, one of three Los Angeles Times’ “Educators for the Millennium,” and the Los Angeles Jazz Society “Educator of the Year.” Berg has accompanied and recorded with numerous performers, including Watrous, Tierney Sutton, Peter Erskine, Patti Austin, Clark Terry, Monica Mancini, John Clayton, Lorraine Feather, Frank Potenza and Carmen Bradford.

 

Berg says, “Someone wrote a beautiful thing about six years ago: that I was ‘the best jazz pianist you never heard of.’ I think the release of Blackbird will give my rise from ‘obscurity’ a giant step. Now I’m at a time in my life where playing means the most it ever has to me. I want to play as much as I can. Hopefully, Blackbird will become a vehicle for doing that.” To support the release of the CD, the Shelly Berg Trio will initially tour in the Midwest and on the East Coast. Berg says, “I would like to play in clubs as well as other venues because Blackbird is kind of an intimate record.”

 

But his goals for Blackbird go beyond increased recognition. “I think that one of the greatest things about music is that it can have a very healing effect on human beings. I just hope this music makes people glad they listened to it and that it makes them feel good.”

Jazz piano master, Shelly Berg, is returning to the Palladium Side Door this Thursday

Shelly Berg, who’s been called “the best jazz pianist you’ve never heard of,” is actually a familiar name to our audiences. He played the Palladium a few years ago and he’s well known around Florida as a jazz musician and educator.

 

But just in case you are wondering if you want to attend Shelly’s concert this Thursday, Jan. 10, in the Side Door, I’ve gathered some materials that should easily get you to “Yes.”

 

Berg, a multiple Grammy nominee, is paired with two of our favorite jazz musicians, Mark Feinman, drums and Alejandro Arenas, on bass. That same duo back Shelly the last time he was in town and were headliners for our John Lamb Birthday celebration last Sunday.

 

For tickets and information on this show on 1-10-19 at 7:30 p.m. you can call our box office at 727-822-3590 or follow this link for online tickets. While most of the Side Door show is General Admission, a few Reserved seats are still available.

 

Here is a bio and below that, a promo for Shelly’s Grammy nominated 2005 album, Blackbird, on Concord Records:

 

Shelly Berg is a Steinway piano artist and multi-Grammy nominated arranger and producer. His latest album Gershwin Reimagined: An American in London with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is conducted by José Serebrier and produced by Gregg Field (Decca Gold).

 

Shelly BergThe All Music Guide says “Shelly Berg is one of the finest pianists around in the early 21st century playing modern mainstream jazz.” His recording project The Deep with bassist Dave Finck on Chesky Records is widely praised for its versatility and virtuosity with 4.5 stars from DownBeat magazine. His solo project Shelly Berg: The Nearness of You (Arbors) and a two-piano album with Dick Hyman Meeting of Minds (Victoria) are also both critically acclaimed. His album Blackbird, recorded with the Shelly Berg Trio on the Concord Records label, reached #1 in US jazz radio and garnered Record of the Year and Artist of the Year nominations (Jazzweek, 2005).

 

Shelly Berg

Berg was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category as co-arranger of “I Loves You Porgy / There’s a Boat That’s Leavin’ Soon for New York” from the album Rendezvous (2018) featuring jazz singers Clint Holmes and Dee Dee Bridgewater with The Count Basie Orchestra. He was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocals category for his arrangement of “Be My Muse” on Lorraine Feather’s album Flirting with Disaster (2015), as well as his arrangement of “What a Wonderful World” on Gloria Estefan: The Standards (2014), and “Out There” on Lorraine Feather’s Tales of the Unusual (2013). He was also nominated for a Grammy as co-producer of Gloria Estefan: The Standards in the Best Traditional Pop Album category.

 

Other recent recording and arranging projects include Seal’s Standards, Clint Black’s Rendezvous, Arturo Sandoval’s Grammy-winning Dear Diz (Every Day I Think of You) and Latin Grammy-winning A Time for Love, Reneé Fleming’s Christmas in New York with Friends, and Ray Sings, Basie Swings (Concord).

 

Berg is artistic advisor for Jazz Roots at the Adrienne Arsht Center in Miami, musical director of The Jazz Cruise, and host of the show Generation Next on Real Jazz Sirius XM. He has appeared on numerous NPR radio broadcasts for Jim Cullum’s Riverwalk Jazz series.

 

Shelly Berg has performed, recorded and arranged for renown jazz vocalists Patti Austin, Nancy Wilson, Bobby McFerrin, Kurt Elling, Carmen Bradford,  Tierney Sutton, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Lizz Wright, Cassandra Wilson, Lorraine Feather, Monica Mancini, and Dionne Warwick, and performed and/or recorded with a “Who’s Who” of jazz legends including Ray Brown, Louie Bellson, John Clayton, Eddie Daniels, Peter Erskine, Dave Finck, Branford Marsalis, Gregg Field, Chuck Berghofer, Dave Grusin, Woody Herman, Arturo Sandoval, Tom Scott, Clark Terry, and Bill Watrous to name just a few. A finalist in the 1988 Great American Jazz Piano Competition, Berg has recorded over 30 disks for the Yamaha Disklavier piano.

 

His composing and orchestrating for television includes ABC’s Fudge, CBS’s A League of Their Own, and HBO’s Dennis Miller Live. He has performed on television with Zac Brown, Mark Anthony, Gloria Estefan, James Taylor, Garth Brooks, Tricia Yearwood, Prince Royce, Patti LaBelle, Mariah Carey, and has orchestrated for Chicago, KISS, Carole King, Richard Marx, Joe Cocker, Elliott Smith, Lou Rawls, Steve Miller, Yoshiki, X Japan, and others.

 

Film orchestration work includes Warner Bros. Almost Heroes and For Your Consideration, Fox’s Men of Honor, and the NBC mini-series The ’60s. He has written for the Royal Philharmonic, the American Symphony, and orchestras worldwide. He composed the theme song to the 1986 U.S. Olympic Festival, and orchestrated Anniversary for the 10th anniversary of the coronation of Japan’s Emperor Akihito. His orchestrations are called “magnificent. . . incredible” by Johnny Mandel.

 

Shelly Berg is the dean of the Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music at the University of Miami, a position he has held since June 2007. In addition to his leadership role as dean, he is the Patricia L. Frost Professor of Music and teaches classical improvisation classes and private piano students. He previously held the McCoy/Sample endowed professorship of jazz studies in the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California where he taught for 16 years. He is a past president of the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE), and was named 2003 Educator of the Year by the Los Angeles Jazz Society. In 2002, Shelly was the recipient of the IAJE Lawrence Berk Leadership Award. In 2000, the Los Angeles Times named him one of three “Educators for the Millennium.” He has appeared as a performer and lecturer throughout the United States as well as in Canada, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Mexico, Europe, Japan, and Israel.

 

Berg has numerous compositions for jazz ensemble in publication, and his texts include the Chop-Monster improvisation series, Essentials of Jazz Theory, and Rhythm Section Workshop for Jazz Directors (Alfred Publishing), and Jazz Improvisation: The Goal-Note Method (Kendor Music).

 

FROM CONCORD RECORDS:

 

When Shelly Berg releases his first CD on a major label in 2005, the earlier descriptions of his limited recorded output-not to mention his being pigeonholed as an aggressive pianist with jaw-dropping technique-will no doubt be rewritten. Indeed, in stores on January 25, Blackbird reveals a somewhat surprising side to the former head of the International Association of Jazz Educators as he is joined by drummer Gregg Field and bassist Chuck Berghofer.

 

Previously, listeners may have described Berg as a swinging, extroverted musician in the exuberant, indomitable spirit of Oscar Peterson, one of his early inspirations. Blackbird, however, shows Berg to be a much more complex musician who is attuned to a broader range of emotions than his earlier recordings suggested. The CD, exquisitely performed and produced, captures Berg’s trio in a relaxed, sustained performance of songs with personal meaning to the pianist.

 

“With Blackbird, I just wanted to make a beautiful recording where there’s not a gratuitous note. I didn’t want to be thinking of ‘things to do’ on this record. I just wanted to explore the feelings of the songs,” says Berg who admits he’s been waiting for decades to record a few of the tracks on the new CD. He achieves his goal by considering the melodies-and the lyrics, though unsung-of each of the songs. “’All My Tomorrows’ resonates with me because it has one of the most beautiful lyrics that a love song can have. To me, a great song occurs when all of the elements come together.”

 

Berg personalizes the songs on Blackbird with warm voicings, effective dynamics, and a storyteller’s ability to craft an unforgettable dramatic experience from a promising simple theme. For example, the Trio stretches the rests of title track (written by Lennon and McCartney) to allow for glittering ornamentation that illuminates segments of the melody before they stretch out into upbeat straight-ahead improvisation. Those phrases are suspended as if independently overlaid on the underlying rhythm for a contemplation of their harmonic wonders.

 

In an approach similar to “Blackbird,” “She’s Always a Woman” consists of discrete melodic phrases connected by rests of harmonic resolution, though played with an obvious sense of joy. Berg slows Pat Matheny’s “Question and Answer” into a gorgeous jazz waltz whose harmonic possibilities for prismatic richness, the colors inextricably linked through gradual progressions, previously may have been overlooked in faster versions.

 

The undeniably effective underlying spirit of Blackbird reflects the camaraderie among the Trio’s members. Once again, Berg defies expectations by recording with musicians who may not necessarily be associated with this style of jazz. The bandleader notes, “I can’t say enough about Gregg and Chuck. I think their playing is going to raise some eyebrows about what these two guys can do. Their careers are going well, but I think it’s always great for them to get recognition in ways that they haven’t before.”

 

Born in 1955, Shelton G. Berg’s love of jazz came from his father, trumpeter Jay Berg, who performed with touring musicians like Charlie Parker and Sonny Stitt. A young prodigy, he was accepted into the Cleveland Institute of Music at the age of six. He moved to Houston in his early teens and soon thereafter started playing professionally, while still in High School, with Arnett Cobb, who provided him with the opportunity to jam with Lockjaw Davis, Al Grey and other members of Count Basie’s Orchestra, as well as with players from Woody Herman and Buddy Rich’s bands. Graduating summa cum laude twice from the University of Houston with bachelor and masters degrees in music, he worked for 12 years as the director of instrumental music at San Jacinto College in Pasadena, Texas. However, at the recommendation of Bill Watrous, Berg moved to Los Angeles, where he became a professor and the Chair of Jazz Studies in the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California. From 1996 to 1998, he was the president of the IAJE.

 

Musically, Berg has written commercial jingles for a host of Fortune 1000 companies, including Wendy’s, Dole, Texaco and Kelloggs. He has scored for films and television shows like Men of Honor, Almost Heroes, Fudge and Dennis Miller Live. And, he has written for such performers as Kurt Elling, Bonnie Raitt, KISS, Lou Rawls and Richard Marx, as well as the American Symphony, the Royal Philharmonic and the Dallas Philharmonic. In addition to publishing eight books about jazz theory and improvisation, as well as numerous music magazine articles, Berg has received numerous awards, including the IAJE Lawrence Berk Leadership Award, one of three Los Angeles Times’ “Educators for the Millennium,” and the Los Angeles Jazz Society “Educator of the Year.” Berg has accompanied and recorded with numerous performers, including Watrous, Tierney Sutton, Peter Erskine, Patti Austin, Clark Terry, Monica Mancini, John Clayton, Lorraine Feather, Frank Potenza and Carmen Bradford.

 

Berg says, “Someone wrote a beautiful thing about six years ago: that I was ‘the best jazz pianist you never heard of.’ I think the release of Blackbird will give my rise from ‘obscurity’ a giant step. Now I’m at a time in my life where playing means the most it ever has to me. I want to play as much as I can. Hopefully, Blackbird will become a vehicle for doing that.” To support the release of the CD, the Shelly Berg Trio will initially tour in the Midwest and on the East Coast. Berg says, “I would like to play in clubs as well as other venues because Blackbird is kind of an intimate record.”

 

But his goals for Blackbird go beyond increased recognition. “I think that one of the greatest things about music is that it can have a very healing effect on human beings. I just hope this music makes people glad they listened to it and that it makes them feel good.”

MeFi: “Fermentation is diplomacy and canning is a massacre”

There is a moment in the life of fruits and vegetables that has always puzzled and fascinated me. Put out a dish of strawberries, and in days some darker spots will appear. Maybe a thin tendril of mold sprouts out from the strawberry’s body. At this point, you can still eat it, simply by cutting off the moldy bit. But all of a sudden, the strawberry has clearly died. It’s inedible, sour. It has passed over in to the world of bacteria, mold, and minerals-it is no longer a self-regulating organism. It has stopped being an individual, but has become multitudes.

How does this happen? When is an organism living, and when is it dead? When is an organism living, and when is it dead? Where does death come from, and why does this change of state happen so quickly? Amazingly, we’ve developed some techniques to play with this boundary between life and death, stretch it, and blur it.

Vietnam’s Low-tech Food System Takes Advantage of Decay – ” Fermentation is both low-tech and democratic. It can be a fundamental component of a sustainable food system”

At the entrance of a market in Hanoi, a woman with a dưa chua stand tells us that making ‘sour vegetables’ is easy: you just add salt to some cabbage and let it sit for a couple of days. As we talk, several customers come by, eager to scoop some brine and cabbage into a plastic bag. Worried that we’re discouraging her customers, she shoos us away. She isn’t lacking business.

Is fermentation really so effortless? The short answer is yes. Many recipes will call for two things: water and salt. At just a 1:50 ratio (2%) of salt to food, you can create an environment undesireable for all the bad bacteria and encourage all the good ones. Sauerkraut, kimchi, fish sauce, sriracha, and kosher dill pickles-are all made according to this principle.

Yet other types of fermentation are a bit more complicated. They call for sugar (e.g. wild fermented alcohol like ethiopian honey wine), yeast starters (rượu nếp, most wines and beers), special fungi (tempeh, miso), or some kind of combination of fungi, bacteria, salt, or sugar (kombucha). Yet others are simpler: to make cooking vinegar, just let that bottle of bad wine sit for a couple of days, and to make sourdough, just mix water and flour and leave it on your counter.

All in all, fermentation is just controlled decay: your most important ingredient is time. This can sound like a bit too much, too fast. Take the woman I met at the entrance of the market. Her dưa chua, while in great demand, looks like wilted cabbage, soppy, floating in murky brine. Some bubbles are forming on the edges of the plastic container-for the trained eye a sign of an active fermentation process, but for the uninitiated, an alarm bell.

There’s no use beating about the bush. That dưa chua is in fact rotting in a very similar way that a peat swamp is constantly rotting, belching large doses of methane into the world. What’s happening is an anaerobic fermentation-that is, without significant amounts of oxygen. This absence of oxygen and the high levels of salt creates an environment supportive to several bacteria that also find their home in our own digestive systems.

The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katzreview, review

How To Ferment Almost Everything // How To Turn Your Kitchen Into A Fermentation Larder

Preserving Plenty: The Beauty Of Fermented Foods

When I was a kid, every pickle my father ate was a bit of a disappointment. Dad, who grew up in the 1930s and ’40s in the Bronx, New York, remembered plucking kosher sours out of barrels filled with cloudy brine-“Now those were pickles!” he’d tell us. I only knew Claussen and other vinegar-cured pickles, the kind you buy in jars off the supermarket shelf, and I liked them just fine. But when I finally tasted a real pickle-the kind made the old-fashioned way, fermented with nothing more than salt, water, and time-I realized what I had been missing. A vinegary pickle plows through your palate with its tartness (often in a most pleasing way), but a live-cultured, salt-cured, fermented one tells a more multifaceted story. It is sour, to be sure, but it tastes of something more, something elusive: It’s the flavor of Middle Europe captured in one bite.

How to Make Sauerkraut and Become God of Your Own Microbial Universe

Kimchi 101: It Ain’t Just Cabbage

Vietnamese Pickled Mustard Greens – Dua Chua Recipe

Fermented shark, anyone?

Preserved Lemons

Garum: Fermented Fish Sauce for the Ancient Roman Masses

Gajar Kanji Recipe

TABASCO STYLE FERMENTED HOT SAUCE

Everything you always wanted to know about fermented foods

Read this great John Lamb profile before you come to Sunday’s big birthday show

St. Pete Catalyst, the our town’s online daily news site, published a profile of John Lamb today, just before Sunday’s big John Lamb birthday bash at the Palladium.

 

The 85-year-old jazz bassist is also being honored in February with a MUSE Award from the St. Pete Arts Alliance.

 

If you wonder if this former Duke Ellington bassist, and mentor to several generations of local jazz stars, is beloved, just check my ticket sales for Sunday’s 3 p.m. birthday celebration. We’re close to 500 tickets sold. If you want to be part of this party – which includes two sets of all-star jazz curated by Nate Najar, a jazz jam in the Side Door organized by the Al Downing Tampa Bay Jazz Association, a birthday cake and a food truck for between show noshing – just follow this link for on-line tickets and information.

 

And to see the full Catalyst story and read more about everything happening in St. Petersburg, you can follow this link.

 

By BILL DEYOUNG

When people want to engage John Lamb in conversation, usually they’re interested in talking about the decade he spent playing bass in the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Fair enough – those were heady times, jammed ear-to-ear with groundbreaking music, and one of the albums Lamb played on, Far East Suite, won a Grammy.

 

The thing is, that was a ten-year stretch, off and on, and John Lamb just turned 85. He’s lived half of his life now in St. Petersburg, and given so much to the bay area jazz community as a player, teacher and collaborator, and that’s why the Arts Alliance has named him its MUSE Performance Arts Award winner for 2019, and will honor him at a ceremony Feb. 8.

 

Even sooner, a group of his jazz buddies are throwing a birthday party/concert for him – this Sunday, Jan. 6, at the Palladium Theater.

 

After John and his wife Paula settled here, in the late 1970s, they both taught in public schools. Paula Lamb, who passed away in 2003, was also a principal and an area superintendent for 26 Pinellas County elementary schools.

 

He’s justifiably famous for that decade with Duke, but John Lamb was a music teacher, a band director and a substitute teacher – in everything from history to math – for 27 years.

John Lamb and the Duke

“Regardless of what a person goes into, I think they do a certain amount of teaching,” Lamb explains. “Whether it’s in a school, or privately, somebody’s paying attention, somebody’s learning from them. They may be aware or they may not be aware.”

 

Just like he learned from his family, his church, his military experience and his musical influences.

 

The couple had relocated from Philadelphia, to raise their young sons in a less stressful environment. With his resume – he’d also sat in, or gigged with, many of the greats – Lamb knew he’d be welcomed into any local jazz society, anywhere.

 

“Teaching young kids in a school is like having an office in one part of town,” he says, “then you go over to the Junior College to teach young adults, there’s another office. Play a gig, that’s another office. That’s how I looked at it.”

 

Born in Vero Beach, Florida and raised a few miles down U.S. 1 in Fort Pierce, John Lamb wasn’t passionate about much of anything until he started playing tuba in his high school band (he had high hopes about getting into Florida A&M University – he was impressed by the snappy uniforms worn by the college’s famously great marching band – but his family couldn’t afford the tuition.).

 

Instead, he enlisted in the Air Force, and it was during those years – the early-to-mid ’50s – that he realized the double bass was not only cooler than the tuba, he could transpose everything he’d learned about holding down the bottom end to this new instrument.

 

So he studied, and he learned. And once he left the service, he began to haunt the jazz clubs and the after-hours joints, in Philadelphia, Boston and New York. He backed Ella, he sat in with Basie. He jammed with Miles Davis. Billie Holiday’s Chihuahua snapped at him.

 

His hero was Ray Brown, who played bass with Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie and numerous others.

 

When Ellington’s son and aide-de-camp Mercer called to invite the young bassist to audition for the swinging Duke Ellington Orchestra, he was fully immersed in the world of bebop, a distinctly different and less linear form of jazz.

 

“Of course, I had played in big bands in the military,” Lamb recalls. “I listened to Stan Kenton, Les Brown, all the big bands back there. I listened to the older guys, and I listened to the juke box.”

 

For his audition, Lamb was thrown into the deep end. Ellington called the tune, “Stompin’ at the Savoy” in D flat, cleared his throat, waved his arms in a furious blur to count it off, and the band was moving.

 

Lamb had not been given a score. “So I said ‘Uh-oh, I’d better hop in.’ So I did. Fortunately, I had been playing along with the records of Oscar Peterson, and I had learned the tune. I remembered it!”

 

That’s often how it went with the mercurial bandleader. You had to be good – really good – to keep up with him. “Oftentimes, it wouldn’t be written,” Lamb says. “I had to use my experience … or watch the piano player, who was Duke.”

 

Lamb and his bass were always positioned behind, and to the side of, Ellington’s grand piano. So he could watch the master’s left hand to find and follow the root of each song.

 

This went on for three furious years – as part of the big band, and in smaller Ellington combos, Lamb went around the world several times. He was “on call” for seven more years – Mercer would ring up and say “Pops wants you to do so-and-so, are you available?” If he was, he’d go and play the date.

 

Ellington died in 1974, and four years later, with a freshly-earned teaching certificate in his back pocket, Lamb returned to his home state. Because she already had teaching experience, Paula got a job right away.

 

John sold insurance, he sold musical instruments, he took whatever job he had to, before Seminole High School brought him in as band director.

 

From the start, he was a formidable educator. “When the kids would misbehave, I’d pull the bass out in front of the room and play something for them. That got their attention.”

 

He still plays three gigs a week, and is a regular collaborator with guitarist Nate Najar, who considers Lamb a mentor.

 

At 85, he insists that he’s still learning. “I learn more about myself now than I do the instrument, because I have to produce the sounds,” he smiles. “I learn more about me, my thinking, my physical body, my mental body, my spiritual body, what I want to say musically. I think about all those levels. I just don’t think about learning scales. I don’t do that any more.

 

“For a bass player, there are only 12 notes. You learn your 12 notes, you know?”

Brand new Grammy nominee Victor Wainwright brings his full band to the Palladium Jan. 5

 Get your tickets and get on board! Fresh from their Grammy nomination for Best Contemporary Blues Album, Victor Wainwright and The Train are coming to the Palladium on Saturday, Jan. 5.

 

Victor is bringing his full band and he’ll be joined by another boogie woogie piano monster – Bob Seeley, the 90-year-old star of our Boogie Woogie Stomps.  Bob will open the show and there’s a good chance both pianists will take the stage together at some point.

 

Victor Wainwright

Wainwright’s honky-tonk, boogie style is electrifying and a guaranteed good time. With music that touches on every aspect of the blues, a sharp sense of humor, and a knack for storytelling, our audiences hang on every note and word.

 

We already knew Victor was a rising star, but with this Grammy nomination, the “Piana From Savannah’s” star has clearly risen. See you at the show!

 

For tickets and information, follow this link to our on-line box office.

 

Latimore, Damon Fowler featured in Living Blues Magazine and elsewhere this month

Living Blues Magazine is a top notch publication – now on issue number 257 – that is just about as close to the Bible of the blues as we’ve got.

 

And two of our favorite artists – Latimore and Damon Fowler – show up in this month’s issue and Latimore, who sold-out our nightclub last summer and calls Riverview home, is featured on the cover.

 

The story – Latimore: Some Things You Can’t Fake – is a well-researched chronicle of the career of this gentle giant of a man, who has managed to stay relevant and busy for almost 50 years.  The story reveals a few secrets to that longevity. One is that Latimore keeps his performance life and his home life in two different boxes. He plays to adoring fans, but always comes home to Yvonne, his wife of over 40 years, and a quiet life with old friends. The other secret to his success is that Latimore has always just been himself.

 

“I just want to be a better Latimore tomorrow than I am today…if somebody comes out to see Latimore, they gon’ get Latimore.”

 

It helps that he’s a studio-savvy keyboard player who has backed tons of other artists, and his big voice still includes all the high notes. Check out Living Blues by following this link and I suggest you subscribe and help keep this great publication strong.

 

Latimore will be back at the Palladium next summer for sure. And he’s out on the Blues Cruises and lots of festivals this year. Don’t miss him.

 

Damon Fowler shows up in Living Blues along with another Palladium favorite – JP Soars – in the list of songs that are charting on blues radio stations this month. Damon’s new album – The Whiskey Bayou Sessions – comes in at Number 6 for August, right behind a guy named Boz Scaggs. Pretty good company.

 

Damon is bringing his Holiday Blues Bash back to the Palladium on Wednesday, Nov. 21. That’s again the night before Thanksgiving, so Wednesday is definitely a Friday! And he’s bringing Betty Fox, Sean Chambers, Ed Wright, Josh Nelms, Chuck Riley and lots more special guests. Tickets are going fast and available by following this link to our box office.

 

And JP Soars, who I’m hearing on SeriusXMs blue channel, charts in both July and August with Southbound I-95.

 

And Damon’s November Palladium show is featured in a full- page article in the Paradise News this month. Thanks to writer Nanette Wiser for that story.