Walker’s Philadelphia cheesesteak mockery

Several Philly tourists not amused with Scott Walker crashing their lunch. Overheard: “Stand in line with the rest of us.” “Who is that?” — Jenna Johnson (@wpjenna) July 28, 2015 This is silly but sometimes you just gotta stop, smell the roses, and indulge in some mockery of Scott Walker’s cheesesteak choices. It’s the standard more »

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Walker’s Philadelphia cheesesteak mockery

Several Philly tourists not amused with Scott Walker crashing their lunch. Overheard: “Stand in line with the rest of us.” “Who is that?” — Jenna Johnson (@wpjenna) July 28, 2015 This is silly but sometimes you just gotta stop, smell the roses, and indulge in some mockery of Scott Walker’s cheesesteak choices. It’s the standard more »

WI Supreme Court “went well beyond what any court has ever held in opening the floodgates to secret money in politics”

Brendan Fischer of PRWatch was recently interviewed by Janine Jackson of Fair.org. A couple of exerpts: JJ: Well, it sounds as though the charge was that Walker actively sought to skirt finance laws and that the ruling is: Yes, he did, but it’s OK? I mean, help us to understand exactly what happened here. BF: That’s about right. more »

“Well, here goes something into nothing.”

In 2010, nearly fifty years after her death, and more than a hundred years after she became the first person to sing on the radio, the remains of Eugenia Farrar were finally laid to rest. Fittingly, her porcelain memorial urn has her own recording of that first song — “I Love You Truly”etched into its surface using a lathe (similar to the process used for early cylinder recordings).

Laura LaPlaca‘s thoughtful essay — musing on the materiality of this final remaining artifact of a historic broadcast that otherwise left little trace — describes this final resting place as Farrar’s “ashen physical remains protected by the materialized solid form of her voice.”

Fifty years after that historic broadcast by Farrar and radio pioneer Lee de Forest, she joined him on a 1957 broadcast of “This Is Your Life.”

(“When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”)

Republican presidential candidates cluster accounts at bank with only 1 branch in McLean, Virginia

Hmmmmm. From Bloomberg: “According to the most recent Federal Election Commission filings, Chain Bridge is the sole bank serving Jeb Bush’s presidential campaign, which reported raising $11.4 million as of June 30, and his allied super-PAC, Right to Rise, which says it’s raised $103 million so far. Donald Trump’s campaign banks at Chain Bridge, and it’s more »

Jeb Bush says he’s going to see the Pope when he comes to the U.S.

Although he expressed some criticism about Pope Frances earlier this summer, Jeb Bush said at at town-hall meeting just outside of Orlando that he’s a “huge fan” of the current Pontiff, and says he hopes to be “part of the flock” when His Holiness comes to the U.S. in September.

“He’s impressive beyond belief,” Bush said today while speaking to approximately 150 people at the Longwood Events & Rentals center, the second of his three stops in the Orlando area. “And I think he makes a great contribution to the world, and he has every right to have his views on climate change and economics and all the rest.”

That’s a slightly different tune than what Bush said in June, when he was quoted as saying that, “I don’t get economic policy from my bishops or my cardinals or my pope.”

Other Republicans appealing to the evangelical vote like Rick Santorum and Mike  Huckabee have been critical of the Pope for his views on climate change. In his recently published encyclical, the Pope blamed blamed human selfishness for global warming in his long-awaited encyclical calling for action on climate change.

Bush, who is Catholic, said he himself has “deeply held views on economic growth,” and said he didn’t believe they were in conflict with the belief that the truly needy in our society need to be taken care. But the former Florida Governor says the way to alleviate poverty is not by taxing “everything that lives or breathes,” but through “high sustained, economic growth,” which he has said throughout the campaign season can be achieved by having four percent growth in our county.

Of course, that’s a higher growth rate than either Presidents Bush 41 or Bush 43 ever achieved in office, and this particular Bush has never quite said how he’ll accomplish that burst of economic activity.

But back to the Pope.

“I do think Pope Francis is an extraordinary man, and I told Columba that we’re going out to figure out a way to be a part of the flock when he comes to either Philadelphia, New York or Washington because I believe he has a huge role to play.”

Bush continues to play the happy warrior on the campaign front, and called himself “the happy tortoise” when describing this “extraordinary journey” that is running for President of the United States.

Like Barack Obama in 2007-2008, Bush is campaigning on being able to bring Washington together. He spent considerable time as the town-hall was about to wrap up to discuss how he could go about bringing Democrats and Republicans together to change public policy. He said our current politics is defined as demonizing, personalizing and attacking opponents in a personal way. “I want to have a conversation that persuades them,  but I don’t ascribe bad motives” to his opponents he said.

He then discussed how he even thought he could make common cause with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a famous bete noire for Republicans nationwide. Bush admitted he didn’t believe he had a single thing in common with her, but –

“Give me an hour, I bet I could fine one. Focus on that first,” he said. “Don’t ignore if you had one. Let’s have a small celebration and work on that and built on that.”

Like nearly every Republican in the race save John Kasich, much of what Bush says on the trail is criticism of Barack Obama and the job he has done. Regarding our handling of Russia, Bush said that Vladimir Putin will never act the way we want him to by being weak.

“They’ll respond to a position of strength, far more than a position of weakness,” he said, adding that the U.S. needed to stress that NATO is an organization is committed to, and that “we need to isolate Putin from his own people,” though he did not lay out how that would be possible.

On China’s influence, he said that the U.S. had been ignoring Latin America for far too long. “We’re way too passive and the Chinese have become much more aggressive,” he said, but have done so by “blunt forces,” by extracting minerals for example.

He also blasted the Venezuelan government, saying that “they’re making Cuba a good run for their money in terms of failed economic policies.”

Bush will be back in Florida on Friday, speaking at the National Urban League meeting in Fort Lauderdale, where he’ll be joined by Hillary Clinton, Ben Carson, Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley.

The post Jeb Bush says he’s going to see the Pope when he comes to the U.S. appeared first on SaintPetersBlog.

Trump nails Walker on crumbling roads, deficit, underfunded education, Common Core flip-flops

Times are strange when you’re pleased to hear from Donald Trump, eh? What’s really wild is not only do I enjoy hearing Trump slam Walker, I have to admit that Trump is essentially telling the truth about the state of affairs in Wisconsin and about Walker’s flip-flops on Common Core. Donald Trump says he wasn’t more »