Ark and flood in one package

The US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was established in 1961 and has grown into one of the US government’s largest intelligence organizations. It employs 17,000 people, including thousands stationed overseas, and its 2013 fiscal year budget request was for $3.15 billion. Yet, the DIA is also one of the more secretive agencies in the U.S. intelligence community, regularly denying access to basic information about its structure, functions and activities. On November 20, the National Security Archive posted a new sourcebook of over 50 declassified documents that help to illuminate the DIA’s five-decades-long history.

Included:

  • The creation of DIA (Documents 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6).
  • Early CIA-DIA relations (Documents 8, 9, 10).
  • DIA’s role in the Cuban Missile Crisis (Document 44) and the Vietnam War (Document 46).
  • DIA’s 1978 intelligence appraisal of the Shah’s future (Document 14).
  • DIA studies on Chinese nuclear weapons programs (Document 13, Document 17).
  • DIA studies on locating Iraq’s short-range missiles during the first Gulf War (Document 24), its acquisition of aluminum tubes (Document 31), and its “reemerging” nuclear weapons program (Document 33).
  • DIA director Lowell Jacoby’s summary of the CURVEBALL case (Document 36).
  • DIA’s “psychoenergetics” activities (Document 18, Document 21).
  • The DoD Inspector General report on the case of Ana Belen Montes, who served as long-time agent of the Cuban intelligence service (Document 37).

The post also features dozens of issues of the DIA’s in-house publication, Communiqué: the DIA’s unclassified, in-house magazine that was available not only to DIA employees but also to their families. The magazines contain significant information about the DIA that the agency often redacted from other documents released in response to Freedom of Information Act requests. Issues are available from the following years: 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Publication of Communiqué was halted in 2013 following a directive from the agency’s then director, Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn.

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